Adtech

Advertising in 2020 is way more than a billboard on the side of a highway these days. When it comes to catching consumer eyeballs, it’s personal. 

As consumers, we know it well. We can’t scroll to a news site, or any site for that matter, without a barrage of ads that may or may not be tailored to our interests.  And it’s true— thanks to advertising technology, advertisements are more targeted than ever.  

Adtech is a relatively new industry that has become part of the fabric of the modern world, and it’s only just begun. 

For consumers these days, the constant ads are the price of free, and so mostly, we accept it. After all, we aren’t paying for Google search, for Facebook, or to watch our favorite show on YouTube.

The internet-based services that have become so ingrained in our daily lives learn about us so that they can most successfully serve us ads and use those dollars to provide their services. This is especially true since the coronavirus pandemic shifted so many “in-person” norms to virtual experiences.

It’s a crazy world we live in, and for all of the unknowns, we can rest assured that advertising isn’t going away anytime soon. 

What is adtech?

Advertising technology (or adtech) is driven by what’s called programmatic advertising. If that sounds more like an AI algorithm than a sales team, that’s because it is. 

Programmatic advertising is “the real-time buying and selling of ad inventory through an automated bidding system. Programmatic advertising enables brands or agencies to purchase ad impressions on publisher sites or apps through a sophisticated ecosystem.”

And while we all gasp at how expensive Super Bowl commercials are every year, we don’t always consider how companies try to get in front of their target audience 365 days per year while consumers watch, click, and scroll throughout the day.

Programmatic advertising includes display ads, video ads, social ads, audio ads, native ads, and digital out-of-home ads. It’s at play whether we Google something random or tune into the season finale of our favorite show.

Consumer ad fatigue has simply led to more creative ways to grab interest. For example, native ads appear to be part of the media they appear on, rather than stand out like a pop-up or a banner ad. 

The Economist famously used programmatic advertising to tap into an entirely new audience. In one campaign, it generated 650,000 new prospects with a return on investment (ROI) of 10:1 and increased awareness by almost 65%. 

How did it achieve such success? It referenced subscriber, cookie, and content data to identify audience segments (finance, politics, economics, good deeds, careers, technology, and social justice), creating more than 60 ad versions to target potential customers effectively. 

No longer was The Economist considered a dry, intellectual journal by most. Instead, it had new relevance. What’s more, it had new readers. 

Adtech isn’t limited to the internet. For example, how many people have you heard at least consider ditching cable and just using streaming services? Meet connected TV, which is anticipated to grow to reach 204.1 million users by 2022 according to eMarketer. 

As subscribers to services including Netflix, Hulu, Amazon Prime, and Disney Plus have increased, so have over-the-top (OTT) advertising dollars to the tune of $5 billion in 2020. These ads are typically highly personalized according to a viewer’s interest and cannot be skipped, but rather must be viewed to continue consuming content. 

Ads on our computers aren’t the only adtech at play. Digital out-of-home advertising includes the high-tech billboards, on-vehicle ads, etc. Where online advertising can feel nagging, outdoor advertising is innovating in a way that appears interesting and grabs attention. According to IBIS World, in 2019 billboard advertising revenue grew by more than $8.6 billion in advertising revenue.

Why invest in advertising technology?

Lots of companies these days don’t necessarily run on our dollars, they run on our eyeballs, and our clicks. According to VentureBeat.com, “all major ad-supported tech companies are ad tech companies. They market advertising technology and use technology to support their advertising businesses.” This includes Facebook, Google, Pinterest, and Reddit. 

Adtech is the way of the future, especially as technology evolves and consumers become increasingly glued to screens. In addition to enhanced targeting capabilities, programmatic advertising gives companies real-time insights, enhanced targeting capabilities, greater transparency, and better budget utilization. 

Advertising is part of the fabric of our modern culture. Because companies can use platforms to serve us advertisements, we have access to tons of information and entertainment for no cost. As a consumer, it’s hard to ignore. 

It’s not just Google searches and websites that are ideal for digital ads. “In-game brand advertising is set to see tremendous growth in the coming years,” says Ajitpal Pannu, CEO of Smaato, an adtech platform.  “We are building up a strong foundation to support this new media channel.” 

COVID, interestingly, has moved more eyeballs on screens than ever before. And while advertising spending is down across the board as companies move to save money, adtech spending is bound to rebound, making now an ideal time to invest.

How to invest in adtech?

Advertising is by nature a very broad industry. Just about every company advertises in some way, and the technologies driving those activities are all over the map. Fortunately, a search on Magnifi suggests that there are a number of ETFs and mutual funds to help interested investors access the growing adtech sector without having to invest in many different companies.

Magnifi is changing the way we shop for investments, with the world’s first semantic search engine for finance that helps users discover, compare and buy investment products such as ETFs, mutual funds and stocks. Try it for yourself today. 

This blog is sponsored by Magnifi. The information and data are as of the publish date unless otherwise noted and subject to change. This material is provided for informational purposes only and should not be construed as individualized investment advice or an offer or solicitation to buy or sell securities tailored to your needs. This information covers investment and market activity, industry or sector trends, or other broad-based economic or market conditions and should not be construed as investment research or advice. Investors are urged to consult with their financial advisors before buying or selling any securities. Although certain information has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, we do not guarantee its accuracy, completeness or fairness. Past performance is no guarantee of future results. This content may not be reproduced or distributed to any person in whole or in part without the prior written consent of Magnifi. [As a technology company, Magnifi provides access to tools and will be compensated for providing such access. Magnifi does not provide broker-dealer, custodian, investment advice or related investment services.]


There's Alpha in Asia

“Made in China” is a phrase we all know well, but American shopping aisles bursting with “Made in China” goods are becoming more and more a thing of the past, especially as the depth and breadth of Asia’s economies develop. The truth is, this is not just a China story anymore— it’s a story of a new Asia bursting with emerging economies, high-tech industry, and a growing middle class.

Consider that the United Nations estimates that as of July 2020, Asia as a whole has a population of more than 4 billion. That amounts to about 60 percent of the world’s current population.

Asia is growing and its enormous population is buying more and more of its own stuff than ever before. It is estimated that “Asian-Pacific (APAC) countries will have seen a growth in their middle-classes by over 500 percent in the 20 years up to 2030.” This increased buying power will be nothing short of transformative, especially compared with 2 percent growth in Europe and a decline of nearly 5 percent in America over the same period.  

Asia’s global output is up 26% from the early 2000s and, according to McKinsey and Company, “Asia is on track to top 50% of global GDP by 2014 and drive 40 percent of world’s consumption.”

This growth isn’t just thanks to China, but small and medium-sized countries throughout the region, as well. Asian business hubs stretch from Singapore to Jakarta, Kuala Lumpur and Manila. In fact, according to an analysis by The Financial Times, Indonesia is on pace to overtake the world’s sixth-largest economy, Russia, by 2023. 

Not to mention, Asian exports are not reliant on the United States. Moreover, China’s total exports amount to 40% of the world’s consumption. Although exports to the United States fell by more than 8%, they remained about the same from 2018 to 2019. In other words, China was able to compensate for the drop in exports to the US by exporting more to the rest of the world. 

Yes, the region is seeing some political instability in 2020, with protests and crackdowns roiling Hong Kong and other parts of China. But, given the growth that’s happening alongside this, it will take more than that to slow down the Asian expansion.

What’s changing in Asia’s markets?

China is no longer simply making the cheap plastic toys that it may have once been known for. Rather, its products are increasingly high-tech and sophisticated. 

That means two things: The first is that in China, wages are on the rise. The second is that there is a new space globally for low-cost manufacturing that once belonged solely to China. 

Vietnam’s exports are up 96% since 2015, a surge led by the export of low-cost textiles. (It’s worth noting that Vietnam is also home to a global manufacturing base for Samsung.)

In India, Prime Minister Narendra Modi launched the “Make in India” initiative with the goal of developing India into a manufacturing hub that is recognizable on the global scene. And it seems to be working, with India’s exports up 22.5% since 2015.   

All of that manufacturing would literally go absolutely nowhere without streamlined logistics, however. “The logistics industry accounts for 15-20% of GDP in Vietnam and is expected to grow up to 12 percent in Indonesia.” In large part, this growth is thanks to both increased investment and streamlined e-commerce. 

Why invest in Asia?

Asia might be set to overcome the West as a center of trade and commerce, but it’s not there yet. And it’s not without challenges. Many countries that are home to emerging markets have also become home to the challenges of emerging countries.

Take infrastructure, as an example. 

Paired with challenging geography, poor roadways can devastate supply chains. But, supply chain challenges like those found in Asia can largely be overcome by technology solutions, such as Route Optimization, Predictive Alerts, AI-based forward and reverse logistics, and smart shipment sorting. Additionally, infrastructure spending is on the rise in Southeast Asia, through the formation of institutions such as the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank and the Japan Infrastructure Fund.  

Countries like Indonesia have shown that economic growth for smaller, emerging countries is sustainable. Not only is Indonesia rich with natural resources, it is committed to specialized manufacturing including that of machinery, electronics, automotive and auto-parts. The country has slashed its “poverty rate by more than half since 1999, to 9.4% in 2019.” It’s most recent economic plan implemented in 2005 was for 20 years, broken into 5 year increments.

In all, the Asian continent, with its emerging middle class, increased focus on high-tech manufacturing, and participation by lesser-known counties, has long-term growth potential. And, with this momentum already in full swing, the future looks bright for countries across the continent.

That’s what happens when emerging markets “emerge” all the way into fully developed economies.

Magnifi is changing the way we shop for investments, with the world’s first semantic search engine for finance that helps users discover, compare and buy investment products such as ETFs, mutual funds and stocks. Try it for yourself today. 

This blog is sponsored by Magnifi. The information and data are as of the publish date unless otherwise noted and subject to change. This material is provided for informational purposes only and should not be construed as individualized investment advice or an offer or solicitation to buy or sell securities tailored to your needs. This information covers investment and market activity, industry or sector trends, or other broad-based economic or market conditions and should not be construed as investment research or advice. Investors are urged to consult with their financial advisors before buying or selling any securities. Although certain information has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, we do not guarantee its accuracy, completeness or fairness. Past performance is no guarantee of future results. This content may not be reproduced or distributed to any person in whole or in part without the prior written consent of Magnifi. [As a technology company, Magnifi provides access to tools and will be compensated for providing such access. Magnifi does not provide broker-dealer, custodian, investment advice or related investment services.]


vegan

Vegan

From coconut coffee creamers and dairy-free yogurt to veggie burgers, the market for plant-based, natural foods and beverages are outpacing total food and beverage sales overall. 

According to SPINS’ 2019 State of the Natural Industry, the market for natural food and beverage products is growing at 5.0% compared to that of total food and beverages growing at 1.7% year-over-year.

While the growth is astounding, it’s not necessarily surprising. 

If you’ve been to the grocery store recently, you know that plant-based products are no longer limited to one aisle and aren’t marketed to just one specific type of consumer. Plant-based products are everywhere and stores are asking all shoppers to try them. 

In other words, you don’t have to be a strict vegan to buy the latest brand of oat milk or plant butter.  

And, more and more consumers are trying the plant-based versions of more traditional products, knowingly or unknowingly adopting a flexible vegetarian status known “flexitarian.”

The term flexitarian was coined in 2009 by registered dietitian Dawn Jackson Blatner who promoted eating more plants and less meat overall, or rather, being vegetarian most of the time. The diet is geared to promote overall health while not totally depriving followers of animal-based products.  

Because of the lax guidelines that allow for mostly eating more veggies that the diet promotes, consumers are increasingly adopting it in one form or another—and eating more vegan products than ever.  

Consider the success story of Beyond Meat, the plant-based burger company whose stocks skyrocketed after going public in May 2019, up 213% by November. According to UBS investment, Beyond Meat’s sales could reach $1.8 billion by 2025.

Who is buying Beyond Meat’s plant-based burgers? It’s not just vegans, but meat eaters, too. 

As the number of vegans (including those with part-time buy-in) is on the rise, so is the unprecedented demand for plant-based products in grocery stores, restaurants, and beyond.

What is Veganism?

Vegetarian diets typically eliminate meat and fish but allow for the consumption of eggs and dairy. Veganism is much more restrictive, eliminating all items of animal origin, including any food made with animal flesh, dairy products, eggs, or honey. The authentic Vegan lifestyle goes further, extending beyond food consumption to everything from textiles to clothing and cosmetics.

Generally, veganism offers three primary features: (1) additional curtailment of animal mistreatment and slaughter, (2) reduction of certain health risks, and (3) decrease of environmental footprint. 

That’s right, it’s good for the environment. 

Beyond being healthy for our bodies, veganism is promoted as a tool to combat climate change. Raising meat requires a massive use of grain and water. After slaughter, farmed animals are processed, transported, and stored, requiring the consumption of even more energy. Plant-based options tend to be more environmentally friendly. 

The number of people choosing to live a vegan lifestyle worldwide is on the rise.  In the United States, the demographic has grown by 600 percent between 2014 and 2018, from 4 million to 20 million people. The vegan population in the UK similarly quadrupled between 2014 and 2018.

This growth of veganism in conjunction with non- or sometimes-vegan consumers who buy plant-based foods for health and environmental reasons means a fast-growing market and more investment opportunities than ever. 

Why Invest in Veganism?

Vegan products are a $7.1 billion market, growing at a rate of 10.1%. The plant-based meat market alone is anticipated to be valued at $27.9 billion by 2025 globally. 

The market for other plant-based dairy alternatives, like cheese and milk, are also growing at unprecedented rates. Milk alternatives include soy milk, almond milk, rice milk, oat milk, coconut milk, and flaxseed milk. According to a recent study, the global dairy alternatives market is expected to grow, reaching $26.86 billion by 2023. 

Alternatives to traditional butter exist as well. The US plant-based butter industry is valued at $198 million and growing. Between 2017 and 2019, sales of plant-based butter increased 15%, growing faster than the sales of traditional butter.

And these trends are going mainstream. In addition to niche plant-based butter brands like Milkadamia and Miyoko, Country Crock debuted its “Plant Butter” made with olive oil, avocado oil, and almond oil in September 2019. Non-dairy yogurts made with almonds, cashews, or coconut are also on the rise. 

This phenomenon isn’t just on grocery store shelves, but in restaurants, too. White Castle offers the Impossible Sliders, Burger King offers the Impossible Whopper, and Carl’s Jr.’s offers the charbroiled Beyond Famous Star. 

And, Wall Street is taking notice the sales of plant-based products. Beyond Investing introduced the US Vegan Climate ETF, listed on the New York Stock Exchange under the ticker VEGN, in fall 2019. The ETF excludes oil-related stocks as well as meat-centric companies. 

Vegans are passionate about the environment and their health. And, no matter what degree of vegan one is, they are willing to pay the cash for the burger that’s just as good or maybe even better than the meat alternative. 

In other words, plant-based products are here to stay, and varieties and consumer buy-in are sure to grow.

How to Invest in Veganism

But getting involved in a market segment as large and diverse as veganism — which impacts everything from food & beverage, to personal care, clothing and more — isn’t as straightforward as it sounds. But, by investing in mutual funds and ETFs that offer exposure to veganism as a whole, investors can spread their impact out to all of the companies that are working in this sector. A search on Magnifi suggests there are a number of ways for investors to get involved in veganism this way.

Magnifi is changing the way we shop for investments, with the world’s first semantic search engine for finance that helps users discover, compare and buy investment products such as ETFs, mutual funds and stocks. Try it for yourself today. 

This blog is sponsored by Magnifi. The information and data are as of the publish date unless otherwise noted and subject to change. This material is provided for informational purposes only and should not be construed as individualized investment advice or an offer or solicitation to buy or sell securities tailored to your needs. This information covers investment and market activity, industry or sector trends, or other broad-based economic or market conditions and should not be construed as investment research or advice. Investors are urged to consult with their financial advisors before buying or selling any securities. Although certain information has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, we do not guarantee its accuracy, completeness or fairness. Past performance is no guarantee of future results. This content may not be reproduced or distributed to any person in whole or in part without the prior written consent of Magnifi. [As a technology company, Magnifi provides access to tools and will be compensated for providing such access. Magnifi does not provide broker-dealer, custodian, investment advice or related investment services.]


Gap Inc

Gap (GPS)

A mainstay of malls and shopping centers across the U.S. in the 1990s, Gap Inc. (GPS) is today a clothing and accessories retailer with operations around the world. Founded as a jeans shop in San Francisco in 1969, Gap today sells a wide variety of products for men, women and children, including sportswear, activewear, and more.

The company’s six primary divisions include retail outlets The Gap, upscale store Banana Republic, discount retailer Old Navy, fitness wear brand Athleta, curated fashion site Intermix, and Hill City, a maker of performance menswear. 

As of 2018, Gap’s revenue was $16.6 billion and it was the largest specialty retailer in the U.S. It currently operates more than 3,700 stores worldwide, more than 60% of which are in North America.

Rationale

The most direct way to gain exposure to Gap is to buy its listed shares, of course, but its participation in the extremely competitive retail and fashion markets might make many reconsider that approach. Companies like GPS have to stay ahead of the constantly shifting trends in fashion in order to remain competitive in the marketplace. What’s more, Gap’s reliance on mall and shopping center locations puts it at risk as consumer choice moves away from brick and mortar shopping to more online purchases.

However, for investors interested in gaining exposure to the retail and consumer spending sector, rather than buying GPS shares themselves should consider buying funds that provide exposure to Gap and other similar firms. After all, the return drivers that will benefit GPS might also benefit other similar retail firms. As investment management is gradually moving to the construction of portfolios using ETFs and mutual funds in addition to single stocks, investors would do well to consider gain exposure to firms like Gap through these types of funds.

Investing in GPS

A search on Magnifi suggests that investors can gain access to GPS via a number of different funds and ETFs, including those shown below. 

Magnifi is changing the way we shop for investments, with the world’s first semantic search engine for finance that helps users discover, compare and buy investment products such as ETFs, mutual funds and stocks. Try it for yourself today.

This blog is sponsored by Magnifi. The information and data are as of the publish date unless otherwise noted and subject to change. This material is provided for informational purposes only and should not be construed as individualized investment advice or an offer or solicitation to buy or sell securities tailored to your needs. This information covers investment and market activity, industry or sector trends, or other broad-based economic or market conditions and should not be construed as investment research or advice. Investors are urged to consult with their financial advisors before buying or selling any securities. Although certain information has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, we do not guarantee its accuracy, completeness or fairness. Past performance is no guarantee of future results. This content may not be reproduced or distributed to any person in whole or in part without the prior written consent of Magnifi. [As a technology company, Magnifi provides access to tools and will be compensated for providing such access. Magnifi does not provide broker-dealer, custodian, investment advice or related investment services.]      

 

 

 


Lululemon (LULU)

Who knew that selling yoga pants could be so lucrative? Chip Wilson, the founder of Canadian athleticwear retailer Lululemon Athleta (LULU) certainly did when he started the company out of his Vancouver apartment in 1998. In part, LULU arrived at just the right time. In the early 2000s, yoga was on an upswing, and between 2012 and 2016 the number of Americans doing yoga grew by 50%. Today, 1/3 of all Americans has tried it at least one, and the population of over-50 practitioners has tripled since 2015.

Lululemon designs and sells a wide variety of athletic wear, having expanded beyond its core product of yoga pants. Today the inventory in its 460 stores includes tops, casual pants, shorts, sweaters, jackets, undergarments, accessories, yoga mats, water bottles, shoes and more.

In 2018, Lululemon reported revenue of $3.29 billion, up from just $358 million a decade earlier.

Rationale 

A direct way to gain exposure to Lululemon is to buy the listed shares. But that can be a risky approach, given LULU’s focus on the consumer market. It’s fair to believe that Chip Wilson caught lightning in a bottle with the explosive growth of the yoga market shortly after he launched the company, but Lululemon’s breakneck growth since then has largely been predicated on new store openings and reaching out to new potential customers. However, fashion trends can change rapidly, and the population of customers who have not yet tried yoga or purchased from Lululemon is shrinking, reducing its future growth potential.

A solution that can dampen some of that volatility is to buy funds that provide exposure to Lululemon and other similar firms, rather than LULU shares themselves. After all, the return drivers that will benefit Lululemon might also benefit other similar firms in sporting goods, athleticwear, and footwear. As investment management is gradually moving to the construction of portfolios using ETFs and mutual funds in addition to single stocks, investors would do well to consider gain exposure to firms like LULU through these types of funds.

Investing in LULU

A search on Magnifi suggests that investors can gain access to LULU via a number of different funds and ETFs, including those shown below. 

Magnifi is changing the way we shop for investments, with the world’s first semantic search engine for finance that helps users discover, compare and buy investment products such as ETFs, mutual funds and stocks. Try it for yourself today.

This blog is sponsored by Magnifi. The information and data are as of the publish date unless otherwise noted and subject to change. This material is provided for informational purposes only and should not be construed as individualized investment advice or an offer or solicitation to buy or sell securities tailored to your needs. This information covers investment and market activity, industry or sector trends, or other broad-based economic or market conditions and should not be construed as investment research or advice. Investors are urged to consult with their financial advisors before buying or selling any securities. Although certain information has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, we do not guarantee its accuracy, completeness or fairness. Past performance is no guarantee of future results. This content may not be reproduced or distributed to any person in whole or in part without the prior written consent of Magnifi. [As a technology company, Magnifi provides access to tools and will be compensated for providing such access. Magnifi does not provide broker-dealer, custodian, investment advice or related investment services.]